The Dual Agency Agreement and Why You Shouldn't Sign It

When Dual Agency May Occur

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The possibility of dual agency arises when a home buyer is working with a real estate agent who's Brokerage is also listing the property they want to purchase. This means the real estate Broker/Brokerage who has agreed to list a property for a seller is now working with the buyer of that same property. Remember, the Broker already has a fiduciary agreement with the seller of the home.

As a home buyer, you can choose not to sign a Consent for Dual Agency Agreement.

 

You can work with an Exclusive Buyers Agent who is an advocate for you, the home buyer. Exclusive buyer agents are members of the National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents. (naeba.org) Exclusive Buyer Agents are Realtors who work for Brokerages that do not list homes for sale so there is no dual agency agreement. 

When both the buyer and seller have agents working for the same Brokerage, both clients are being represented by the same Brokerage. This creates a potential conflict of interest, particularly for the home buyer. In addition, the Brokerage collects double the commission creating a situation where one Brokerage can list & sell a property. As the home buyer, do you see how this could work against your best interests?

  • Is your agent showing you all the available properties that meet your criteria or are they pushing their Brokerage's in house inventory?

  • Is your agent providing the best guidance on how much to offer for a home particularly if their Brokerage is listing the property?

  • Is your agent sharing insights and strategies that will be an advantage to you, the home buyer?

  • Is your agent looking for the best price and terms for you? How likely is this to happen if the Brokerage already has an agreement with the home seller to work for their best interests?

  • Is your agent protecting your contractual contingencies and always keeping your best interests in mind?

An Exclusive Buyer Agent offers a level of protection and dedication not available under other types of real estate agency.

By the virtue of their fiduciary relationship with the home buyer, Exclusive Buyer Agents will disclose information to the buyer that materially affects a buyer’s best interests, even if that information is detrimental to the seller! The listing agent cannot make such disclosures and must remain loyal to the seller. This is why buying a home from the local "neighborhood specialist" may not be in your best interest.

Remember, your best interest are not being considered if you consent to a straight dual agency agreement. This is when the agent representing the seller agrees to "work" with you to buy the listing. This type of dual agency is illegal in every other profession.

Can you imagine a lawyer coming into a courtroom with the plaintiff and turning to the defendant and saying, "Hey, I can represent you in this case too!" Of course not, this is absurd!  

Exclusive Buyer Agents will work as your advocate, offering advice so you can make an informed decision. Exclusive Buyer Agents have no "in-house" listings to push and no reason to talk you into buying any particular home. Call us so we can discuss your needs and where you want to live in the Greater Washington D.C. or Baltimore areas. We love what we do and look forward to making your home buying experience as smooth as possible. 

Cellphone 301.922.1677 Work phone 301.657.1475 or Email: Victoria@buyersagent.com

Here’s the rub...a dual agent does not exclusively represent either the seller or buyer; there may be a conflict of interest because the interest of the seller and buyer may be different or adverse. As a dual agent, the real estate broker does not owe undivided loyalty to either the seller or buyer.
— http://www.mdrealtor.org/Legal/Legal-Hotline/Frequently-Asked-Questions/PostId/17

Exclusive Buyer Agents in Takoma Park

When you are buying a home in Maryland, Washington D.C. or Virginia, you hope to buy a home in a vibrant community.

Victoria Ray Henderson best buyers agent



Takoma Park Maryland and Takoma Park Washington DC residents are passionate about their town. For one thing, Takoma Park has counter culture roots. Back in the 60's, Takoma Park looked like a mini version of Haight Street in San Francisco. Funky shops lined the Carroll Avenue, the main street through town. In addition, the Seventh Day Adventist Church had headquarters in Takoma Park for several decades. The Adventist’s vegetarian based diet influenced the town’s restaurants. While the headquarters are no longer in Takoma Park, veggie and vegan style food can be found in the Co-op, restaurants and at the farmer’s markets and the annual Takoma Park Street Festival.

Today, the city still has a grass roots vibe which is evident when you listen to the new radio station, WOWD 94.3. The tree lined streets with Victorians and stately old homes are updated and home prices are on the rise. You can still find some bargains, old homes that need lots of love & work, but many of the older homes are listed in the upper 900's to a million. 

Marshall and I had dinner at Buysboys & Poets, a restaurant and bookstore where local poets and musicians perform on a small stage. It's wonderful to see Takoma Park's positive growth as the community maintains its activist roots. I am very fond of Takoma Park. I went to high school here and my children were born at the Washington Adventist hospital on Carroll Avenue in Takoma Park. It's a great place to raise a family and an easy commute to downtown Washington DC. 

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Proud members of NAEBA serving home buyers in Virginia, Maryland & Washington D.C. with Buyer’s Edge




Completely remodeled home, what does that mean?

There's an expectation when you see the phrase "completely remodeled" in a home listed for sale.  

virginia house and street Victoria Ray Henderson best buyers agent.jpg

 

Remodel, according to Merriam-Webster dictionary means to change the structure, shape or appearance of something. 

 

When the phrase "completely remodeled" is used in the description of a listing, many homebuyers expect the entire house to be updated. 

But in reality, a house advertised as "completely remodeled"  could have a number of big-ticket items that are either original or close to the end of their use. In fact, we find this to be true more often than not. So with that in mind... 

Here's what you need to look for when you see the phrase "completely remodeled" in the description of a home.

  • Electrical upgrades- The standard for household power used to be 60 amps. Today modern homes need as much as 200 amps to run all the electrical needs. High definition televisions, computers, air conditioners and home automation devices require lots of power to run. Have a home inspector check the entry cable coming into the house and the electrical panel. If the house has original or outdated wiring, consider upgrading for safety and function purposes. 

  • Roof - Depending on the size of a house and the style of shingles, a new roof can cost between $8000 and $40,000 dollars. The age of a roof is a very important consideration when buying a house. While you are touring the house with your buyer agent, check the roof to see if any shingles are curling. See if there are any cracked or missing shingles. Finally, look for bald spots or areas of the roof where the granules are gone. These are all signs of an older roof. If you move ahead with the purchase of the home, make sure your home inspector gives you an estimate on the age of the roof.

  • Outlets - This falls under the electrical upgrade category but it's important to pay close attention to the electrical outlets in a home. We still see the old-fashioned 2 prong outlets in houses in the Greater Washington DC area. These older outlets do not have the ground wires to protect people and electrical devices in case of a fault. Today's modern houses should have the 3 prong outlets for safety and function purposes. If you're like me and you don't know how to change out these outlets, hire an electrician. 

  • Water Heater & HVAC - Most water heaters have an 8 to 12-year lifespan. If the heater is an A&O Smith or another higher quality water heater, it may last longer. Take a picture of the HVAC label and google it to determine the age. If the unit has been well maintained, there will be a label from an HVAC company with service dates. Again, this can be done when you are touring a home. If you decide to purchase a house and schedule a home inspection, the inspector will determine the age and condition of the HVAC unit and water heater. 

  • Plumbing -  Plumbing problems can be very expensive. When you are touring a house that you like, turn on the faucets to check pressure. Look under sinks for signs of water issues. Look up at the ceiling to see if there are any stains. You can't always see a plumbing problem but it's a good idea to ask the seller if they have a record of plumbing maintenance. 

  • Foundation - Check the basement walls for large cracks or bulges. Look at the house exterior for signs of moisture or cracks. Examine the landscaping to see how well the yard is graded. Water should be moving away from the house, not toward the foundation. Again, this advice is for homebuyers as they tour a property of interest. Once you have a ratified contract and hire a home inspector, he/she should be able to offer excellent advice on the condition of a home. 

  • Completely Remodeled is a red flag phrase for buyer agents. The first thing we do is go into the basement to check the HVAC system. We look for signs of water intrusion. Outside, we walk the perimeter of the house looking for low spots near the foundation. Any place that is not sealed is a place where water can get into the home and compromise the basement and/or foundation. We are not home inspectors! We are simply advocates for home buyers. We always look for what’s wrong and what’s right with a property.

HomesBuyHendersons

Buyer's Edge

National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents

Top Five Communication Skills Buyer Agents Need

If You Are Buying A Home, Consider Working With An Advocate. Exclusive Buyer Agents naeba.org

VictoriaRayHenderson best buyer agent

Exclusive Buyer Agents-members of NAEBA are dedicated to serving home buyers. 100% of the time and in every real estate transaction.

1. More Listening, Less Talking-as experienced Realtors, we have important information to convey to our Buyer clients. We want to share the good and bad things we discover on a house tour. Since this is what we do and where we shine, it's easy to keep talking and talking. However, keep in mind, clients are processing information too. If we talk more than listen, they may feel oversaturated and begin to tune us out. If we want to make a point, we should, but follow up by asking for their opinion. 

2.  Have Clients Write a Wish List-this is extremely important! Buying a home is an emotional experience. Most of us dream about our "perfect" home. We imagine our families gathering around the fireplace or entertaining friends in spacious surroundings. The best way to make this happen is to write it down! It's so easy to get distracted on house tours. Maintain clarity and focus by checking your wish list again and again. 

3. Pay attention to the Relative/Friend Your Client Brings Along-we may not want to answer questions or listen to the opinion of our clients friend or relatives but remember, they do. That is why they invited them! I am not suggesting we agree with everything someone says but we should treat this person with respect. Be patient as they talk and make their points. If they are dead wrong, we can respectively give our opinion on the matter and let it go. There is no need to move the conversation in an awkward direction just to make our point. 

4. Ask lots of Questions-Do you think this home has curb appeal? Does the kitchen space serve your needs? Do you mind walking up and down 2 flights of stairs to do laundry? You get the idea. What our client thinks-matters. By identifying what they want, we save time and facilitate the home buying process.

5.  Follow Up that Evening or the next Day-After a long day of house hunting, write down the highlights and send your client an email. Let them know what you liked and ask them if they want to make changes to their home search. Try to do this while it is fresh in your mind. Again, this will save you valuable time and validate opinions and concerns your clients made during the home tour. 

These five points can be effectively used in personal relationships too!

Beautiful Houses and Bad Neighbors

It's the single biggest disappointment-to find a house...

next to a very messy neighbor

trash in backyard Victoria Ray Henderson best buyer agent.jpg

 

My client and I stood in the backyard of a large brick colonial style house near a Metro station. He checked off three major items from his "What My House Must Have" list. 

1. large beautiful backyard backing to trees

2. brick colonial home-classic style, built in the 40's with crown molding, arched doorways and hardwood oak floors

3. walking distance to Metro-everyone in the DC area knows the value of an easy commute.

 

So there we were, loving the yard, house and commute and staring at piles of blue plastic containers that looked like small beer kegs.

There were dozens of them-strewn around the neighbors back yard. In one corner of the neighbors yard, the blue containers were stacked to create a makeshift table covered with piles of paint cans and heavy black plastic. And then we saw the back porch-piled with wet paper boxes. The porch was packed! There was no way to open the back screen door and no space to walk inside. 

I pointed out every container and pile of trash in the neighbors yard. While we were upstairs admiring the master bedroom, I showed my Buyer how much more trash we could see in the neighbors yard from the bedroom window. Finally, he said, "let's go".

It's not easy walking away from a great house with an awesome backyard. It's especially difficult to walk away when the only problem is the house or yard next door! Just consider this-

A neighbors yard is an expression of who they are, it's a display of their passion-a reflection of their true personality 

Still think neighbors don't really matter? Read The Best Bad Neighbors of 2015 these true stories will scare you into the reality that you cannot change your neighbors.

Moral of the story-

When you want to buy a home, research neighborhoods & communities, review the master plan from the county and always evaluate the homes and yards adjacent to a house you are touring. 

Consider the Not So Perfect House

When we were looking for our home, I had a vivid mental picture of what it would look.

My dream home did not include shag carpet and a kitchen with formica countertops. 

Pig at Maryland State Fair with best buyers agent



House after house, I kept looking for my perfect dream home. Working with our exclusive buyer agent, we determined that a well constructed home was our top priority. We did not want a “McMansion” with low quality materials and craftsmanship. We focused on older homes in established neighborhoods where homes were built with brick with hardwood floors on every level.

The first day I saw our house, I walked out saying, "Nope!" The second time, my exclusive buyers agent pointed out all the positives-

brick construction

hardwood floors throughout

backyard backs to woods & looks like a private park

on a cul-de-sac in an established neighborhood with trees 

fireplace

3 full bathrooms

I walked out of my house again but this time, my husband and I discussed the possibilities. We loved the brick construction, hardwood floors and beautiful backyard and neighborhood. 

I couldn't see past the ugly chandeliers, shag carpet and dingy older windows.

The house was stuck in the 70's with a real "Brady Bunch" vibe.

After lots of talking and lamenting about "the perfect house" we bought our home. We've lived here for 22 years-and absolutely love it! Why? Because our house has good bones. We replaced the original casement windows with larger Anderson windows. In the family room, we removed the old sliding glass door and louvered windows. My husband, Marshall installed french doors with beautiful floor to ceiling windows on either side.

The floors were refinished and the entire house was painted. We replaced the old chandeliers with beautiful Pottery Barn style lighting.

Photo by  rawkkim  on  Unsplash

Photo by rawkkim on Unsplash

Consider the "not so perfect house" when you find a house that meets your criteria that cannot change. This would include things like;

 Is the neighborhood a good fit for you and your family?

Does the daily commute work for you? Is the home built well with solid construction? 

If a homes needs paint and updated kitchen and bathrooms but is otherwise perfect-give it consideration. My personal home buying experience is no different from many home buyers today. We've all watched way too much HGTV and want, what we want, right now! But if a house has true potential, and needs mostly cosmetic updates, it could become your dream home. 

My grandfather used to say;  "You Can't Make a Silk Purse from a Sow's Ear"

 In regard to home construction, this phrase means if something is not built well with solid materials and skilled craftsmanship, it’s not going to be a quality home. We see poorly constructed homes all over the Greater DC area. Many times, these homes will have new granite counter tops, wall -to wall carpet and maybe updated bathrooms.

But the truth is, if the bones of a house are no good-it's a sow's ear! 

HomesBuyHendersons

Buyer's Edge

National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents

U.S Department of Housing



Water is Your Worst Enemy

How To Check a House For Water Problems

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Earlier this summer, I was with my client on a home inspection. The home was a Baltimore rowhouse on Federal Hill, built in 1900. After discovering that three of the four walls of the house were wet and there was mold in the crawlspace under the kitchen, my client voided the contract. 

The sellers said they were not aware of water issues in the basement and offered a home warranty to the buyer.

However, no home warranty could fix this problem. The moisture in the basement walls had been there long enough to buckle the drywall. The linoleum flooring was peeling up in the corners. And where there was wall-to-wall carpeting, it felt damp to the touch.

We used the walk away option in the home inspection addendum and the home inspector did not charge my clients.

I hope the sellers used the information in the home inspection report to address the serious water issues but we will never know for sure. I did notice the house was back on the market just a few days after we voided our contract. This is one of the main reasons why we, almost always advise our clients to use a home inspection addendum in their offer. In rare occasions, when there is competition for a good condition condominium, we will recommend waiving the home inspection contingency but we still recommend having one for informational purposes.

We will never know if they corrected the water intrusion problem because we walked away from the deal. 

On a home inspection this week, the inspector used a moisture meter on the back wall of the house. The meter turned yellow indicating that some moisture was present. We walked outside to check the grading against the back wall and sure enough, it wasn't done properly. With this property, my client decided to stay in the deal. He plans to properly grade the yard and caulk around the windows to keep moisture out of the home. 

What should you look for while touring houses?

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  • Look at the soil around the base of the house. 

  • You want to see grading that moves water away, not toward the exterior walls.

  • Are there low areas next to the exterior walls like in the picture above? If so, the area needs to be filled with dirt and graded so it slopes away from the house.

  • Are the downspouts directing water away from the home? 

  • If there is a patio or concrete walkway next to an exterior wall, is the seam properly caulked? Anywhere there is a crack or open area between concrete and an exterior wall, there is an opportunity for water intrusion. 

  • Look at the roof. Are the shingles curled? If so, the roof may be old and near the end of its useful life. 

  • Is there a sump pump in the basement? This is good since the pump works to move water from under the house to the outside. 

  • Check under the stairs in the basement. Look for any original or older wood to see if water has wicked up from the floor. 

  • How does the house smell? Moisture has a distinct smell so pay close attention to what your nose is telling you! 

  • Look up! Check the ceilings in every room to see if there are water stains or recent patching.

Beware of flipped properties!

The bad flips always update the kitchen and bathrooms and ignore the HVAC, roof, water heater and electrical panel.

In other words, some flippers focus on what catches a buyers eye. They’ll install granite countertops in the kitchen, subway tile in the bathroom and leave the old HVAC, roof and water heater. In many older homes, flippers will leave the old 100 amp electrical system and opt to save money not installing a heavy up for the house. A heavy up increases the amperage coming into the house at the service panel or electrical box. This means the electrical system in the house can handle the needs of current homeowners today.

Buyer Agent Advice on How to Sell A Home

What Do Buyer Agents Know About Selling Homes

Photo by  Jason Leung  on  Unsplash

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

 

Turns out-quite a lot!  As Exclusive Buyer Agents with Buyer's Edge, we tour lots and lots of houses. We walk to Metro with our clients to understand their daily commute. We visit farmers markets and local restaurants to get the feel of the community. And we tell our home buyers to write a Needs & Wants List .  On Monday, we took new clients to fourteen houses. We saw colonials, raised ramblers, ranch style ramblers and contemporary style homes. Since we are Exclusive Buyer Agents, we evaluate homes and property with our clients.

In our humble, yet well traveled opinion, we have advice for home sellers. 

  • Clean Your House-We understand you live in the house you're selling but try to make the bed, flush the toilet and put the dishes away before buyers take a tour

  • Tone Down the Colors-Lime green living room walls may brighten your mood but it's a big turn off to most Home Buyers. Consider painting walls in neutral colors. If you leave the walls as-is, consider touching up colors so they have neat edges along the ceiling and trim.

  • Continuity in Style-We toured a house that looked like the circus had come to town! The kitchen had two different style & color wood cabinets with another wood for flooring. The dining room had yellow wall to wall carpet with gray and yellow walls.  The adjoining family room had orange carpet and beige/brown walls. This "theme" went on and on throughout the house. 

  • Clear Out the Excess-I mean pictures & papers on the refrigerator, tooth & hair brushes on the sink counter and shoes piled in heaps around doorways. If you are moving anyway, why not clear out now?

Some home buyers want a fixer upper home. They do not mind painting, changing cabinets and fixtures and sanding floors. However this is not the typical attitude of home buyers in the Washington DC area.  

Home Buyers Want to Fall in Love with a Home

If you are selling your home, why not make it easy for them? 

Thinking About Buying a Fixer-Upper?

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Here are a few major points to consider before you buy a fixer-upper.

Time had stopped in a house we toured last week.

The in-house speaker system was original and installed in 1958. All the bathrooms had original tile, sinks, and tubs. The kitchen had original cabinets and only the refrigerator had been replaced. The basement had asbestos tiles on the floor and a swingin' Rat Pack style bar that took up an entire wall. 

How much do you think it would cost to fix this place up? 

Many home buyers love the character, craftsmanship, and detail found in an older home.  But before you buy a fixer-upper, seriously consider the following questions.

  • What projects can you do yourself? Is the house built prior to 1978? Do it yourself projects can quickly grow and take up more time than you planned. If the house is built prior to 1978, it's likely lead-based paint is on the walls, window trim, and doors. If you're removing walls or making any major changes on an older home, you'll need to hire professionals to do the work. Lead paint and asbestos removal is not cheap!According to Home Advisor, it can cost between $200 and $700 to hire professionals to do this type of work. 

  • Will the house need an electrical heavy up and updating for outlets & switches? Most houses today include a 200 amp electrical service. This allows homeowners to run as many circuits as needed. Older homes may have only 100 amp service which is often not enough electricity for homeowners needs today. A licensed electrician should be hired to do a heavy up which usually costs between $1500-$2500. If you're handy, you may be able to replace old outlets with GFI protected outlets but this work takes skill and you'll want to be sure to turn off the main power before doing any electrical work. 

  • What is the condition of the roof, structure & foundation? Depending on the size and condition, roof replacement can be expensive. If the roof is near the end of it's useful life, adjust your offer to reflect the cost of replacement. If there are foundation issues, seriously consider walking away! To avoid buying a house with foundation problems, spend time examining the exterior and interior walls.  Last spring, we found large, jagged cracks along the brick foundation of an older home. In the basement of the home, the wall bulged from the cracks in the wall. This is an expensive problem! If you have any questions about the foundation of a property, hire a structural engineer. 

  • Give serious consideration before you waive a home inspection. With the exception of an almost new condominium, we have never advised our buyers to waive a home inspection. We have, in competitive situations, done a pre-offer home inspection. This is done when there are multiple offers on a property and you want to write a contract offer that is not contingent on the home inspection. 

Remember, hire professionals to thoroughly evaluate a home. If the house is on well & septic or has a pool, these should be inspected by a professional. The more you can learn about your investment, the more confident you can be in moving ahead with the purchase. 

How Important is a Survey When Buying a Home?

When buying a single family home, you don't want any surprises. 

Many of our new home buyers have asked us if they really need to pay the extra money to get a property survey.

After all, the backyard is already fenced, isn’t that enough?
— Home buyer in Washington D.C.
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Buying a home is the most expensive purchase most of us make in a lifetime.

And you are not just buying the house, you are buying the parcel of land that the house sits on. So the short answer to the question above is, "Yes! You should seriously consider paying for a survey when you are buying a home."

A land survey is a map showing the legal boundaries of a property. The surveyor measures the property and identifies buildings on a property.

In some cases, like when we had our property surveyed in Maryland, the surveyor drove flagged metal stakes into the ground to identify the boundaries. Sometimes surveyors put concrete markers into the ground when the house is built. We found one of these when our surveyor came out to determine the line between our neighbors' property and our property line. 

 

A house location drawing is not a boundary survey. 

A house location drawing is fairly accurate and indicates where the house sits on the property. 

It does not, show the property lines. To have a true understanding of your property size, we recommend paying for the boundary survey. Depending on the lot size and location, a boundary survey can cost between $500 to over $1000. 

  • You will save yourself a lot of trouble if you get a boundary survey. In our case, we paid for a survey and erected a privacy fence. Our neighbor, who was an original buyer from 1961 complained that we had built the fence on his land. However, he was mistaken. He had long thought our side yard was his yard. The fence set the record straight and we were glad to regain the use of our land. 

  • Keep a copy of your boundary survey. If you want to build a shed or plant trees or bushes near your property line, you may need to provide the survey to your County or other local officials. 

Your settlement attorney or title company should answer all your questions about boundary surveys. Remember, you are not just buying the house, you are buying the property. You will want to know what land is yours. Someday, if you decide to sell your house, a buyer will want answers to these questions. If there are any issues with easements or encroachments, you will have a problem. 

 

Happy House Hunting! 

Exclusive buyer agents with Buyer's Edge

HomesBuyHendersons.com

What Does Love Have To Do With Buying A Home?

"True love is the greatest thing, in the world-except for a nice MLT – mutton, lettuce and tomato sandwich, where the mutton is nice and lean and the tomato is ripe. They’re so perky, I love that." Miracle Max

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The 1987 movie Princess Bride is a beautiful story about true love.

Princess Buttercup and Wesley encounter serious obstacles (the entire movie) but eventually end up together and live happily ever after.

True Love Prevails!

This true love story is a lot like buying a home. There is no such thing as the perfect house for everyone! Every home buyer has unique expectations and dreams regarding their home. So if you are planning to buy a home this Spring, consider why love matters!  

  • Love your Neighborhood - You can remodel and fix up a house but you can't do much to change your neighborhood. You need to love your location first and then focus on the house. To love your neighborhood, you'll want to write a list of what's important to you and your partner. How long is your daily commute? Have you actually driven the route and determined you can live with it? Is there an HOA? Do you think you can abide by rules? Loving your location is imperative if you really want to enjoy your daily life.
  • Love the bones of the house - My grandfather had a great expression, "You can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear." Keep this in mind when buying a home. If it's poorly constructed with cheap aluminum siding with sagging garage door headers-don't buy it. You will regret the purchase even if you do all the right upgrades on the house. 
  • Love the flow - I've seen hundreds of galley kitchens in the Washington & Baltimore area.These kitchen designs were popular back in the day when the wife cooked and then served family and guests in the dining room. Thankfully, those days are gone! If a house you love has a galley kitchen, consider taking down a wall and opening up the space.Galley kitchens are one of the biggest drawbacks for home buyers who are touring older homes. 
  • Love the outdoors - Even if you don't spend lots of time in a yard, it's important to consider who your neighbors will be. Do they have tidy yards? Is there any privacy? If not, is there room for a few trees or a privacy fence? The biggest gray area when buying a home is who lives next door. If you are considering buying a home, drive by in the evening and on the weekend and try to meet a few neighbors. This could help you move ahead with writing a contract or run! 

Love Matters in Real Estate

Best wishes for a happy & successful house hunting adventure this Spring!

 

What to Know for a Pre-Drywall Inspection

A Pre Drywall Walk Through Is One of The Most Important Steps

Of Buying a Brand New Home

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At this stage of the home building process, the Builder or Site Manager walks through the home with the homeowners. The framing, heating and air ducts, electrical wiring, plumbing and possibly tubs and shower pans will be in place. 

Before the drywall is installed, it's easier to make changes to the electrical outlets, lighting, plumbing and/or framing.

 What To Look For in a Pre Drywall Walk Through

  • Take pictures of electrical wiring, plumbing, and air ducts. On a recent pre-drywall walk through with our clients, we asked the Builder to move two recessed lights and an electrical box for a ceiling fan. He agreed. Our client took pictures showing the current location of the lights and electrical box.  The pictures document the conversation.
  • Check placement for electrical boxes in each room. Before the pre-drywall walkthrough, the Builder and home buyer meet for a design meeting.  This is when you decide the location of electrical outlets, ceiling fan wiring and cable lines for your home. During the walkthrough, make sure these items are in the proper location. Now is the time to make changes to things that will soon be covered by walls and ceilings. 
  •  Be sure the air registers are placed properly in each room. All the rooms of the house should have registers. The ductwork connecting the registers shouldn't be dented or blocked in any way. 
  • Your washing machine should have a washing pan.  If the pan is not in place, make sure it's on the Builder's checklist. The pan catches overflows if the washing machine leaks or overflows. 
  • Are the doors, windows and garage doors the style & design you've chosen?  During our pre-drywall walk through with clients last week, we discovered that the Builder installed the wrong patio doors. He agreed to make the correction and we took pictures to document. 
  • Ask the Builder to show you the location of the cleanouts for the plumbing. Sometime in the future, you, or a plumber, will need to access the cleanout. Take notes during the walkthrough so you remember where clean outs are located. 

 

Finally, we recommend hiring a licensed independent home inspector.

This will be an additional cost, but it's well worth the expense. Home inspectors evaluate the foundation, floor, walls, framing, electrical, plumbing, roof structure, windows, doors and rough-in components. The home inspector will answer all your questions and provide a detailed report. 

This inspection would be in addition to, not instead of, the Builder's walkthrough and home inspection.  

Here are more sources for you if you are buying new construction. 

 

American Society of Home Inspectors

National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents

National Association of Home Builders

Residential Performance Construction Guidelines

Beautiful Home and Bad Neighbor

It's the single biggest disappointment-to find a house...

next to a very messy neighbor

My Buyer and I stood in the backyard of a large brick colonial style house near a Metro station. He checked off three major items from his "What My House Must Have" list. 

1. large beautiful backyard backing to trees and then a soccer field

2. brick colonial home classic style, built in the 40's with crown molding, arched doorways and hardwood oak floors

3. walking distance to Metro-everyone in the DC area knows the value of an easy commute. Buying a home near a Metro station is a great find!

VictoriarayHendersontrashyard

So there we were, loving the yard, house, and commute and staring at piles of blue plastic containers that looked like small beer kegs.

There were dozens of them strewn around the neighbors back yard. In one corner of the neighbor's yard, the blue containers were stacked to create a makeshift table covered with piles of paint cans and heavy black plastic. And then we saw the back porch-piled with wet paper boxes. The porch was packed! There was no way to open the back screen door and no space to walk inside.

I pointed out every container and pile of trash in the neighbor's yard. While we were upstairs admiring the master bedroom, I showed my Buyer how much more trash we could see in the neighbor's yard from the bedroom window. Finally, he said, "let's go".

It's not easy walking away from a great house with an awesome backyard. It's especially difficult to walk away when the only problem is the house or yard next door! Just consider this-

A neighbor's yard is an expression of who they are, it's a display of their passion and a reflection of their true personality

Still, think neighbors don't really matter? ReadThe Best Bad Neighbors of 2015 these true stories will scare you into the reality that you cannot change your neighbors.

Moral of the story-

When you want to buy a home,research neighborhoods & communities, review the master planfrom the county and always evaluate the homes and yards adjacent to a house you are touring. 

To learn more about exclusive buyer agents visit

BuyersAgent.com HomesBuyHendersons

and NAEBA.org

Habits of Millennial Home Buyers

Who are Millennials?

Is their approach to buying a home different than Gen X'ers or Baby Boomers? 

Millennials, according to Pew Research, are 18-34 years of age in 2015. These men and women overtake baby boomers as America's largest generation-according to population estimates by the Census BureauImmigration adds more numbers to this group than any other. By the year 2036, Millenial population is expected to peak at 81.1 million

So what are Millennials looking for in a home? Are they confident, city dwellers with expectations that are wildly different from previous home buyers?  

Not really-they have the American dream of owning their own home, just like home buyers before them. Here's a breakdown of the survey done by the Responsive Home Project

  • 83% of Millenials want space in a less populated community
  • 85% of Millenials buy a home to build personal equity
  • 86% of Millenials want outdoor space for entertaining and plenty of space in the home
  • Walkability ranks very high for most Millenial home buyers. They want to be close to parks, grocery stores and schools with community activities close by too. 

Millenials are searching for homes, on their own, more than any other generation of home buyers. Mobile apps make it easy and fun to learn about schools, communities, and home prices in neighborhoods. And finally, Millenials are more likely than other groups to interview several Realtors before choosing someone. 

Buying a home is an expensive adventure...and it should be fun! If you're buying a home or just thinking about getting started, here are a few things to do-

  • Interview several Realtors and trust your gut instinct. Are they listening to you? Will they promptly respond to your texts & phone calls? 
  • Review their Buyer Broker agreement. Can you really break up with them or are you wedded to their company? At Buyer's Edge, you can end your agreement by email. Again, trust your gut before signing with a real estate company.
  • Are they showing you houses & condos that you want to see or houses they want to sell? Remember, you are the one financing this transaction. You deserve to be fully represented by a qualified professional who will guide you through the home buying experience.  

Resources for Home Buyers

The National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents

U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development

Forbes-10 Things You Have to Know Before Buying a Home

NAEBA Strict Code of Ethics

Buyers Edge

Homes Buy Hendersons

Inspection of a Crawlspace

A home inspection is a vital part of the home buying process. We recommend several home inspectors who are licensed, experienced and highly qualified but remember it's always the home buyers choice. 

Last summer, one of our buyers hired a home inspector we didn't know. The inspector, Glenford Blanc, is with Pro-Spex. We were impressed by Glen's knowledge about homes. He patiently answered all of our buyers questions and showed him what was right and wrong with the home. He also uses a drone during home inspections when roofs are too steep to climb.  Pro-Spex made our "cut" and the company, which employs about 8 home inspectors, is now on our preferred home inspectors list. We also recommend Jeff Pearce with The Pearce Group who is licensed in Maryland, Virginia and Washington D.C. In addition to being a licensed home inspector, Jeff has a background in HVAC installation. 

Bobby Mayberry owns RPM Home Inspect. He is licensed in Washington D.C. and Virginia. Bobby stars in our video titled, "Inspection of a Crawlspace" 

Marshall and I enjoy working with Bobby because he goes through the house with our home buyers explaining how everything works. He encourages buyers to ask questions and like our other preferred home inspectors, he provides a detailed home inspection report. If you are buying a home in the Greater Washington D.C area, consider working with exclusive buyer agents with Buyer's Edge. We are licensed in Virginia, Maryland and Washington D.C. and advocate for home buyers through the entire home buying process. 

Bobby Mayberry with RPM inspecting a crawlspace. He recommends conditioning crawlspaces. If you DIY $500 If you hire someone to do the work $1500 a $2000 Buyer's Edge 4849 Rugby Avenue Bethesda, MD 20814 301.657.1475 or 301.922.1677

Thank you for watching our video on the inspection of a crawlspace. Watch other videos on our YouTube Channel and have a great day!